Create Your Own Signature Stamps

 

Experiment with type fonts.  Many interesting fonts are free to download from the internet.  The signatures pictured here are done in raw clay.  Signatures can be altered with a craft knife after curing if the lines aren’t as perfect as you would like.  These signatures range in size from one inch to 2.50” wide.

If you’ve admired polymer clay projects that feature a neat stamp with the artist’s signature on the surface, this project will help you to do the same.

This signature stamp is made with polymer clay.  I originally thought it could also be used like a rubber stamp but after more experimentation I found the ink does not always adhere to clay as it does to rubber.  While the stamp is unreliable when used with ink, it’s ideal for making impressions in raw clay.  Of course you can make more than signatures with this technique.  Images will work as well.  See examples on my page, Stop Paying For Texture Sheets and Rubber Stamps and my Leafy Bud Vase project.

Your signature stamp can be your actual signature or one using a script font from your computer.  When using your own signature, you should write it with a fat marker for best results.  However your signature is created, remember you must open closed circles and loops (like the top of the “g” ) when creating the stencil.  Close them later if you choose when they are in raw clay form.

It would be misleading to say cutting the signature for your stamp is easy.  Not everyone will have the patience to cut three copies of a signature from card stock using a craft knife, especially if the letters are small.  It will take determination, but it can be done.  If you have a Silhouette machine, or know someone with one, the job immediately becomes easier.

Before you begin, condition all clay colors.  Cutting should be done on plastic film which will allow you to easily rotate the work when necessary.

IMPORTANT NOTE - Setting numbers vary on clay conditioning machines.  On my machine the thickest setting is 1 and the thinnest is 9.

Directions

step 1 - Cut three identical copies of the signature then glue them together with paper glue or spray adhesive. I recommend repositionable spray adhesive as it allows you to move the card stock if it is not aligned perfectly on the first try. Cutting copies is simple for Silhouette users and each copy is perfectly identical.

step 1 - Cut three identical copies of the signature then glue them together with paper glue or spray adhesive. I recommend repositionable spray adhesive as it allows you to move the card stock if it is not aligned perfectly on the first try. Cutting copies is simple for Silhouette users and each copy is perfectly identical.

step 2 - Condition and roll out any scrap clay on a #1 setting of the conditioning machine or use a roller to flatten it to at least 1/8” thick.

step 3 - Sprinkle baby powder onto a paper towel.  Rub the readable side of the stencil against the powder which will prevent clay from sticking to the card stock. Remember, the signature has to be flipped to stamp correctly. 

step 3 - Sprinkle baby powder onto a paper towel.  Rub the readable side of the stencil against the powder which will prevent clay from sticking to the card stock. Remember, the signature has to be flipped to stamp correctly. 

step 4 - Place the card stock onto the clay with the unreadable side facing up.  Either run them together through the conditioning machine on the widest setting, or roll over the signature with an acrylic roller until the clay has risen up to the top layer of the card stock.  Carefully peel the card stock away from the clay.

step 4 - Place the card stock onto the clay with the unreadable side facing up.  Either run them together through the conditioning machine on the widest setting, or roll over the signature with an acrylic roller until the clay has risen up to the top layer of the card stock.  Carefully peel the card stock away from the clay.

step 5 - Press a plastic spatula outside the signature area to flatten the surrounding clay slightly.

step 5 - Press a plastic spatula outside the signature area to flatten the surrounding clay slightly.

step 6 - Cut away the flattened clay.

step 6 - Cut away the flattened clay.

step 7 - Roll out two more sheets of 1/8” clay and cut them to match the signature stamp size.  Press them together then press the edges of the signature sheet onto the two new sheets.  Very gently, press a flat solid object larger in size than the square, onto the signature to insure that the surface will be level after baking.  Pressing too hard will distort and flatten the depth of the letters.

step 8 - Bake the clay in a 275 degree oven for 30 minutes on a flat tile or glass.

step 9 - While the clay is baking create a handle for the stamp by rolling a thick stub of scrap clay in the palm of your hands.  Tap both ends on a flat surface to level them.  Squeeze the stub in the center which will create a slight knob you can use to grip the stamp.

step 9 - While the clay is baking create a handle for the stamp by rolling a thick stub of scrap clay in the palm of your hands.  Tap both ends on a flat surface to level them.  Squeeze the stub in the center which will create a slight knob you can use to grip the stamp.

step 10 - Apply liquid polymer to the knob and place it onto the center of the cured and cooled square.  Bake it at 275 degrees for 30 minutes.

step 10 - Apply liquid polymer to the knob and place it onto the center of the cured and cooled square.  Bake it at 275 degrees for 30 minutes.

 

NOTE
You can improve not-so-perfect letter edges by shaving the cured clay with a craft knife. 

Use the cured stamp to make an impression in raw clay by applying baby powder to it before pressing it into the clay.


Supplies

At Amazon

  •  Sculpey Clay
  •  Sculpey Clay conditioning machine
  •  Sculpey Super Slicer blade set
  • Sculpey Liquid Polymer Clay
  • Sculpey Acrylic Roller
  • Spray Mount Repositionable Adhesive

Miscellaneous

  • plastic wrap
  • baby powder
  • card stock
  • craft knife
 
Curio

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